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    Dr Mark J. Jones


Lecturer in Phonetics
Department of Language and Communication Science
City University London
Room 208, Social Sciences Building
Northampton Square
London EC1V 0HB


Affiliated Lecturer in Phonetics
Department of Linguistics
University of Cambridge
Cambridge CB3 9DA

Email   markjjones.delete-this-text@cantab.net


Research

I'm a phonetician/speech scientist with interests in speech production and laboratory phonology. After gaining my PhD from Cambridge, I was a British Academy Post-doctoral Research Fellow in the Department of Linguistics at the University of Cambridge (2005-2008). At the time of writing (October 2010) I'm a lecturer in phonetics in the Department of Language & Communication Science at City University London, and also affiliated lecturer in phonetics in the Department of Linguistics at the University of Cambridge. In previous years I've been involved with teaching in the Department of Language & Linguistic Science at the University of York, at the University of Manchester, and at UCL.

My interests are really in the origins and sources of variability and the relationship between speech as physical activity and language as something more abstract. That covers questions like "if all humans have essentially the same vocal tract and cognitive/perceptual apparatus, why are human languages so different?", "why does the 'same' speech contrast vary phonetically across different languages?" and even down to "why does one person sound different from another?" The limits of speaker control in the face of biological and language-specific constraints is perhaps another way of putting it. So far my research has looked at phenomena in Slovene, Italian, Hindi, Welsh, Polish, and different varieties of English. My work on non-standard Englishes has been phonetic rather than sociolinguistic - I'm interested in what people do (or perhaps better, can do) not in who does what. Sound change is another area of interest because it relates to how cross-linguistic differences emerge and what their consequences might be.

Latest

In January 2010 I gave a talk on "The benefits of larynx lowering for human speech production" at the University of York. [Download PDF (367 KB)].

In March 2010 I presented at the Colloquium of the British Association of Academic Phoneticians (BAAP) in London: a single-author paper on the phonetic encoding of grammatical boundaries ([Download PDF (175 KB)]), and a joint-author poster (with Dr Rachael-Anne Knight of City University, London) on the role of subglottal resonances in the acoustics of English /r/ ([Download PDF (257 KB)]).


Teaching

My teaching experience covers lectures, practical classes, and tutorials, as well as examining (oral and written) at undergraduate and postgraduate level in Cambridge and London (UCL 2005, 2009; City, 2008-2009, present), York (2009-2010), and Manchester (2008). I've taught at various times in the University of Cambridge, from January-April 2005 at the Department of Phonetics and Linguistics, University College London. The courses and subject areas which I've taught are listed below.

  • Practical phonetics (University of Cambridge, and University College London Jan-Apr 2005);
  • Phonetics tutorials, lectures, and lab classes (University of Cambridge, and University College London Jan-Apr 2005);
  • The Structure of English (phonology and morphology) lecture course and tutorials (University of Cambridge).
  • Historical linguistics (sound change and reconstruction) lecture course and tutorials (University of Cambridge).
  • Structures and varieties' students can access the lecture slides & handouts here.

    In August 2008 I was a tutor on the UCL Summer Course in English Phonetics (SCEP), and in both 2008 and 2009 I acted as an examiner for the International Phonetic Association.


    Work in progress

  • Jones, Mark J. (in preparation). "Fricative dispersion effects in three dialects of English."
  • Jones, Mark J. (in preparation). "Aspiration in Hindi s-plosive clusters."
  • Knight, Rachael-Anne, & Mark J. Jones. (in preparation). "Syllable affiliation of sandhi-r in British English."
  • Jones, Mark J., & Rachael-Anne Knight. (eds.) (in preparation). Continuum companion to phonetics. Continuum Publications.
  • Publications

  • Jones, Mark J. (submitted). “Patterns of variability in apical trills: an acoustic study of data from 19 languages.”
  • Jones, Mark J. (submitted). “Infantilisms, variation and change in the individual.” Chapter for inclusion in the Handbook of Historical Phonology, edited by Joseph Salmons & Patrick Honeybone, Oxford University Press.
  • Foulkes. Paul, Gerard Docherty, & Mark J. Jones. (2010). “Stops.” In Sociophonetics: a student’s guide, edited by Marianna di Paolo & Malcah Yaeger-Dror, Routledge.
  • Jones, Mark J., & Kirsty McDougall. (2009). “The acoustic character of fricated /t/ in Australian English: a comparison with /s/ and /S/.” Journal of the International Phonetic Association 39: 265-289.
  • Knight, Rachael-Anne, Christina Villafana Dalcher, and Mark J. Jones. (2008). "Cue switching in the perception of approximants: evidence from two English dialects." Penn Working Papers in Linguistics14.2.[Download here]
  • and Carmen Llamas (2008). "Fricated realisations of /t/ in Dublin and Middlesbrough English." English Language and Linguistics 12(3): 419-443. Abstract here.
  • (2007). "Glottals and grammar: definite article reduction and morpheme boundaries." Leeds Working Papers in Linguistics 12. [Download PDF (675 KB)]
  • and Francis Nolan (2007). "An acoustic study of North Welsh voiceless fricatives." In Proceedings of the XVIth International Congress of Phonetic Sciences. [Download PDF (336 KB)].
  • Knight, Rachael-Anne, Christina Villafana Dalcher, and Mark J. Jones. (2007). "A real-time study of rhotic acquisition in British English." In Proceedings of the XVIth International Congress of Phonetic Sciences. [Download PDF (389 KB)].
  • and Kirsty McDougall (2006). "A comparative acoustic study of Australian English fricated /t/: assessing the Irish (English) link." Proceedings of the Eleventh Australasian International Conference on Speech Science and Technology 2006, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand, December 6 -- 8 2006. [Download PDF (520 KB)]
  • (2005). "An experimental acoustic study of dental and interdental non-sibilant fricatives in the speech of a single speaker." Cambridge Occasional Papers in Linguistics 2. [Download PDF (1615 KB)]
  • (2004). "The origin of retroflex plosives in Italian, Sardinian, and Corsican dialects." Cambridge Occasional Papers in Linguistics 1: 147-156. [Download PDF]
  • and Carmen Llamas. (2003). "Fricated pre-aspirated /t/ in Middlesbrough English: an acoustic study." In Solé, M. J., D. Recasens, and J. Romero. (eds.). Proceedings of the 15th International Congress of Phonetic Sciences, Barcelona: 655-658. [Download PDF (600 KB)]
  • (2002). "The status of the ‘syllabic’ trill in Slovene: a phonological and phonetic analysis." Slovene Studies 24: 27-46 (published August 2004).
  • [Download PDF (1074 KB)]
  • (2002). "More on the instability of interdental fricatives." Word 53(1): 1-8.
  • (2002). "The origin of Definite Article Reduction in northern English dialects: evidence from dialect allomorphy." English Language and Linguistics 6: 325-345.
  • Klemola, Juhani, and Mark J. Jones. (1999). "The Leeds Corpus of English dialects Project." In Upton, Clive, and Katie Wales, (eds.) Dialectal Variation in English (Proceedings of the Harold Orton Centenary Conference 1998). Leeds Studies in English 30: 17-30.
  • (1999). "The Phonology of Definite Article Reduction." In Upton, Clive, and Katie Wales, (eds.) Dialectal Variation in English (Proceedings of the Harold Orton Centenary Conference 1998). Leeds Studies in English 30: 103-121.
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    Membership of Professional Organisations

  • International Phonetic Association (IPA).
  • British Association of Academic Phoneticians (BAAP).
  • International Speech Communication Association (ISCA).
  • Association for Laboratory Phonology (LabPhon).

  • Links

  • Dept. of Language and Communication Science, City University London
  • Cambridge University Phonetics Lab website
  • The International Phonetic Association site


  • Page last updated Wednesday 20th October 2010